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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  July 26, 2009 10:00pm-11:00pm EDT

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a poor neighborhood and a strong faith. ♪ but you know me ♪ but you know me ♪ anybody been baptized -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com right now on cnn, what happens next? sarah palin give up her day job. a farewell speech full of folksy banner and fury over the media and critic. time is running out. republicans are divided. democrats are divided. president obama is in the middle. he hits the road again soon to sell health care reform. will you buy it? plus, no holding back. >> we have, as white fox, the privilege of what i call obliviousness. >> the discussion on race that everyone is talking about. we had it last night. it is back tonight by popular demand. and -- we go one on one with lance armstrong tonight, right now in the news. good evening, i'm don lemon.
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sara pail season out of a job. she won't be unemployed for long. she left her post as alaska governor today as planned. but it is a speculation about what she does next that has everyone talking. she has strong support among conservatives. she's already been the vice presidential nominee on the republican ticket. still she has her critics. and judging by her comments today, she is ready to take them on. >> and, first, some straight talk for some, just some, in the media. because another right protected for all of us is freedom of the press. and you have such important jobs. reporting facts and informing the electorate and exerting power to influence. you represent what could and should be a respected, honest profession, that could and should be a cornerstone of our democracy. democracy depends on you. and that is why -- that's why
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our troops are willing to die for you. so how about in honor of the american soldier, you quit making things up? let me tell you -- [ applause ] alaskans -- alaskans need to really stick together on this with new leadership in this area, especially. encouraging new leadership. got it. stiff be your spine to do what's right for alaska when the pressure mounts. because you're going to see anti-hunting, anti-second amendment circuses from hollywood. and here's how they do it. they use these delicate, tiny, very talented celebrity starlets. they use alaska as a fund-raising tool for their anti-second amendment -- >> she had a lot more to say than that. and watching it all live today with me was our senior political correspondent candy crowley. she joins us again tonight, candy. so still, in that speech where she criticized her critics in the media and gave -- she gave
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very little clues as to what happens to her next. >> she didn't, except for it seems to me that citizen sarah palin sounds an awful lot like politician sarah palin. she's not going to get out of the fray. we know that much. we know, for instance, that one of her first appearances post-governorship will be in california at the library of ronald reagan. that's a pretty -- pretty big signal at least that you're a stalwart republican. we know that she has said she wants to help raise money for like-minded politicians. we know sha she's going to write a book. we also hear, as i'm sure you heard rumors everywhere, that she might get a talk show somewhere. so all of these things, you can make money, you can keep your visibility up there, so there's a lot to be said for making money and making a living out of all that. but they also happen to be sort of mileposts along the road a presidential candidacy. so we call that keeping your
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options open. >> she said, some people don't understand why i'm doing this. at one point, someone yelled out in the audience, why do you do that? something like, we love you. she said, you don't need a title to make a difference. she wanted to continue to make a difference which she doesn't think she needs an title. >> true. i will tell you, however, that any number of republicans who were supporters of hers who believe that she brought a lot of vitality, certainly, to the mccain ticket and to the party, were wildly disappointed in this decision. they just feel like she gave it up after running for something and then you give it up, they found that to be quitting. now, of course, her supporters say, no, no, she just couldn't get anything done. the fact of the matter is for a woman about whom the biggest criticism was she doesn't have enough experience, to quit that elected job to go serve in some other manner can be be brought into question. can she do without a title?
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sometimes it doesn't help to be an elected politician, to run for office. but, again, that's been seen as her vulnerability, not enough experience. so a lot of republicans were disappointed by that. and many of them think that's the reason some her poll numbers have dropped, is her decision to resign. >> certainly is a lightning rod though. thank you very much, candy crowley, our senior political correspondent. thank you for helping me out with that today. chris welsh was there in alaska for sarah palin's speech. chris joins me now from fairbanks. good to see you. you're on the phone all day with us, going through this. about 2,000 people show up, and these are ardent supporters of the former governor. >> right, i mean, for the most part, all people who are basically in love with sarah palin. it was hard to find anyone who disagrees with her. there was one particular group of signs that said they'd rather see palin to texas, quitting was her best move. these are the rare people. this is her home turf. this is not was sill la, but it
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is fairbanks, alaska. these people are people who have, quite frankly, adored sarah palin for quite some time now and a lot of them sad to see her go. some of them even saying they wish she hadn't made this decision to quit. i talk to one man leaving today who's a dissenter, not a person who exactly shares the views of palin. he said that he basically like to see her move to texas, only time he'd like to see her back here is maybe for a fishing trip in the summer. for the most part, people saying we'd love to see her run for president in 2012. they basically want to see a good future for her. >> chris welch, our all-platform journalist in fairbanks. much more on this with the best political team on television. what about her future and what's behind this? we'll discuss that. also, some political comments from the outside the box
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comments biden made about the russian government. in a developing story we first told you about, biden told "the wall street journal" in very blunt terms russia faces big problem in the future. he says their economy is, quote, withering, and in his words they're clinging to something in the past that is not sustainable. today, the secretary of state was asked if the obama administration is sending mixed signals on russia. >> no, i don't, as i just said, vice president was the first person to call for resetting our relationship with russia, and that's what we're in the process of doing. obviously, it's going to take time and effort. the president's summit in moscow a few weeks ago was a great start. and the president said, look, we want a strong, peaceful and pros purse russia. we're going to work with russia. we're going to have areas agreement and areas of disagreement as we do with any other country. the white house issued a statement pledging cooperation with russia. a less than diplomatic tone
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coming from the secretary of state when it comes to issues about waging a war of words on north korea. she did that with officials this week. at issue, north korea's failure to honor previous agreements on nuclear power. today, secretary clinton minced no words. >> we still want north korea to come back to the negotiating table, to be part of an international effort that will lead to denuclearization. but we're not going to reward them for doing what they said they would do in '05, '06, not going to reward them for half-measures. they now know what we in the world community expect. >> accord to the associated press tonight, north korea says it's open to new talks about its disputed nuclear program, but the country didn't give specifics. president obama is putting on a confident face and pushing ahead with health care reform, even though it's all but certain the plan won't make his august deadline. lawmakers say they want to fix
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the system and provide care for almost 50 million americans without insurance. but they remain deeply divided over how to do it. >> the president believes that we're making progress. and as long as we're making progress, that's a very good sign on an issue that we been debating for 40 years. >> the only thing bipartisan about the measures so far is the opposition to them. >> even some hard-line democrats can see the president can't push his health care plan through congress without gop help. looking to the week ahead, the president will speak tomorrow when the u.s. kicks off economic talks with a high-level sc chinese delegation. on tuesday, we'll take health care questions from aarp members during a teletown hall meeting with people can dial in with their questions. president keeps the push going wednesday with health care events in north carolina and virginia. prench frez nicolas sarkozy is in the hospital after suddenly becoming ill. the 54-year-old became faint while jogging near his official
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resident. sarkozy did not lose consciousness. initial tests showed nothing abnormal. the u.s. is preparing for what is expected to be an increase in swine flu cases this fall. the obama administration is spending $1 billion to develop a new h1n1 vaccine. health secretary seen bellious tells cnn the inoculation will likely be ready by october after extensive testing. more than 500 people in missouri have volunteered for clinical trials. this thursday marks the 40th day since violence erupted after last month's disputed presidential election. opposition leader mosuavi has requested a commemoration ceremony to remember the people who died in weeks of street clashes with police. if the request is approved, it would have deep significance to shiite muslims. periods of mourning last four 40
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days in the religion. for india, today in the southeastern part of the country, the indians launch thread first locally built nuclear powered submarine. only five other nations have the capability to build nuclear subs. prime minister singh says there are no, quote, aggressive designs. it is likely to rattle india's next door nuclear rival, pakistan. zelaya is holed up steps away from his home turf. he says he's not leaving. hundreds of supporters have joined him in a sleepy nick rocken border town. hundreds more turned away at military checkpoints. he's asking washington to slap tough sanctions on the coup leaders who forced him into exile. issues of race rose to the fore this week in a stunning way. a discussion you won't want to miss. sarah palin, what motivated
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her to step down? what will she do next? also, it's time for you to be part of our show. twitter, facebook, myspace, ireport.com, we'll get your reports on. burning, itching, plus maximum strength pain relief, on contact. the most complete relief, from preparation h. pain relief on contact. d. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's t stoid. unitee my airways op to hp me bhe bter and it'not a eroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long.
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a white police officer and a black harvard profess remember keeping a low profile this weekend after the arrest that sparked a political torrent that even rattled the white house. cambridge police sergeant james crowley and professor henry lewis gates have been asked to sit down for a beer with the president. the sergeant who arrested the professor outside his home for disorderly conduct is pondering the invitation. >> are you satisfied? >> yes. >> you are? what about that beer on -- what about the beer? are you going to -- yeah are you going up to the vineyard? >> i don't know. >> but presidential invitation or intervention i should say or
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not, pockets of anger still persist. someone posted signs in professor gates' lawn calling him arr racist. joining me, cnn political editor mark press on ton. and april ryan, white house correspondent for american urban radio networks. she's live in baltimore. april, you were at both those briefings. the first comment, the acted stupidly comment, got the president in hot water. and then the second comment that could have calibrated those words, better comment, is also drawing fire. >> historic, both occasions from president owe bomb ma to make those statements. you have the black community, some the black community very, very upset. president obama did get it right about the sensitivity issue. and some of the black ministers across the nation want to have a
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day of prayer and action. because they say what's being overshadowed is the issue of racial profiling. they're saying, look, something happened. let's not deal with the president's words. let's deal with the issue at hand, that henry gates was arrested for something. and they're saying, you know, he was ultimately let go. so they're saying this racial profiling issue is real and we have to look at that. >> mark, at the very least, you know, the administration has to admit, i think it threw them off their game. >> that news conference last week was supposed to be about health care, which was the president's top domestic pry correct. it's something having a lot of problems. when the president goes out and really touches the third rail of everything in america, when you talk about race, and he's really trying to get out in front of health care, when he has people in his own party causing him problems on the issue, i think it's fair to say he was then off his game. >> let's talk about sarah palin. the former governor. everyone wants to know why.
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the conventional wisdom is she has amassed a lot of debt and that it is in big part probably financial that she's doing this now. >> well, you know, there's no question she has the sizable legal debt because of ethics complains lodged against her. somebody said pail season trying to strike the iron while it's hot. we're all focused on 2012. will sarah palin seek the republican nomination? let's say she doesn't seek it. i still say she is going to be a leader in politics. she could be the next face, the next leader of the social conservative movement, which is a very powerful position, which is really to enact policy. >> back at the ranch, they really have to hunker down the administration this week. >> the administration says now that we've kind of turned the water cooler conversation away from the gates situation, we're putting the -- refocussing is back on health care. and this week, we're going to see the president on the road
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wednesday in bristol, virginia, as well as raleigh, north carolina. he's also doing an event tuesday as well. with the aarp. so we're going to see him get back in the fold. in the meantime, they're going to be working out deals behind the scenes and staff and what have you. >> april and mark, thank you very much. we really appreciate it. a second chicago area cemetery is under investigation after human bone is found where it wasn't supposed to be. ter all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid.
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eight people are dead after a wrong way crash just north of new york city. the family's mini-van is twisted.
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one 5-year-old boy in the van survived. he is in critical condition. state police say his mother was driving north in the southbound lanes when she slammed into two cars. she and three other adults were killed. the kids who died all girls ranged in age from 2 to 9 years old. no! no! >> this is just a horrific story. shock and disbelief in that story where a parking lot just outside the philly stadium is a crime scene. a man beaten to death when a bar fight exploded. people filled the streets after the 22-year-old victim was reportedly beaten up in the closing innings of the game. a 30-year-old man is hospitalized in stable condition. officers say dozens of people may have been involved. "the philadelphia inquirer" reports that police plan to charge at least two people in connection with the fight. dug-up bodies, double-sold grave sites. familiar allegations. different chicago area cemetery.
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unearthed human bone found friday at the mt. glenwood cemetery. the sheriff's office is investigating. one family member has filed a lawsuit alleging grave tampering. this comes as workers at burr oak cemetery in the area face felony charges for digging up bodies and reselling the plots. a candid conversation about race in america just ahead. you won't want to miss it, trust me. and one on one with lance armstrong. for once, he didn't win the tour de france but he's happy about de france but he's happy about it. ceit keeps my airways open... to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid.
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heavy rains and flooding on one coast. jacqui, tell us about that. >> we'll start out with the severe storm. it's been a rough weekend for a lot of people here across the northeastern corridor. we've had a lot of hail, a lot of wind damage, power outages. especially right in this corridor, from the mega lop lis, washington, d.c., up towards the
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boston area. new york city in particular got hit real hard through the evening hours. you can see those storms continue to pull on through. want to show you some pictures that we had. this was taken about an hour ago. you can see a big lightning show right over ladder liberty in new york city. we did have severe weather that roll on through. flash flooding in the hoboken area. at least five people in new york and new jersey have been unjured by lightning, two of which had to be revived. very serious. remember your lightning safety rules as we head throughout the weekend, especially if you're going to be outdoors. if you can hear it, it can hit you. if you see it, flee it. more people are killed by lightning than hurricanes or tornadoes. so keep that in mind. as you're out there. we've also got a lot of heat to talk about. to go along with the showers and thundershowers and the flood threat, we've got 1 to 3 inches of rain possible in the watch area here a cross the northeast. here's our weather map for tomorrow. as we head into the workweek, we're expecting to see this
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front stall out. unfortunately, we're going to see more active weather here up and down the eastern seaboard. the anythination's midsection, s and thundershowers. out west, all the heat. you didn't have much over the weekend but as we start tomorrow and throughout much of the workweek, we'll watch it built. record highs can be expected. triple digits for portland. that doesn't happen out west every day. if you're trying to travel, we're going to end it with the worst news of the day. we've got ground stops and many, many hours for delays for you in the northeast. this will likely kind of snowball into tomorrow. so those of you try to leave out early in the morning, keep that in mind. >> many, many hours. you heard it. she warned you. thank you, jacqui. we've been asking what is next for sarah palin here? a lot of you have been responding. here's what family tree girl says. i'm not a fan hers, but she appeals to a lot of folks. she will be strong are outside the gov either's office, can do and say more.
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says, i suspect palin will become a pundit. i see why palin didn't make it in your field. her ability to articulate is awful. and says, it's tough to know what's next for palin but it will involve politics and getting paid. twitter, face book, myspace, i-report.com. she's literally reached the top of the world. an african-american first. we'll meet sophia danonburg. plus, the controversy that swept the nation. a harvard professor versus a cambridge police officer. a candid conversation about race in america. we move it forward. and there is no holding back.
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last night, we took an in-depth look at the issue of race in america in light of the professor gates/officer crowley story this week. something one of our panelists said really resonated with us. the first question we talked about was about sergeant crowley, whether or not he could have been racially profiling mr. gates because he had taught diversity or how not to racially profile at the police academy. so take a listen to our conversation. it's no holds barred. he taught diversity. so, therefore, get over it, andre, does that make a difference? >> that certainly worked in crowley's favor to suggest he is
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perhaps more sensitive -- >> some people say if he taught about diversity and about how not racially profile, he lives in cambridge, he should have known professor gates. >> the other part is you can teach diversity, but you still always have to be on your guard for your own subconscious and implicit attitudes to to the forefront. i teach african-american politics. but that doesn't mean i don't have to deal with my own prejudiced attitudes and i have to check them. you are quite capable of having a racist moment. >> go ahead, tim. >> if i could add to that. five years ago when i wrote my memoir, "white like me" i tell the story that even after 11 or 12 years of doing anti-racism work, not just diversity work, which could mean everything and nothing, but anti-racism work. i got on a plane. for the first time, i had two
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black men at the pilot controls. now, i understand why racism is completely based on false thinking. but what was the first purely emotional thought that popped into my thought? unfortunately, it was not free at last, free at last, it was, instead, oh, my god, can these guys actually flay the plane? now, the good news is, i caught myself and i stifled that belief. the point is, even i had it. if we're going to have an honest conversation, those of us who are white are going to have to admit we have been conditioned to have those reactions just as men have been conditioned to have sexist reactions in regards to women. >> why is it -- i'm going to ask you this. i don't know if i've ever asked this question. what is -- why do white people get so upset when there's any insinuation of racism, if you bring it up just to get it out
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there on the table to get it over with? >> we've come to think racism is a personal individual level thing so if i say that a comment or an action or a joke or whatever was racist, the person thinks i'm calling them a bigot. this is not so much about bigotry. it's not about individual level biases except insofar as we're all conditioned to have them. what racism is, is a social condition, a structural reality. and if you were raised in an environment in which that is everywhere, the odds of you somehow escaping it, not being affected by it are infin test malley small. it's not going to happen. if we acknowledge it isn't personal. and understand that we must be about the business of undoing it, both at the individual and institutional level, we wouldn't have -- >> isn't it in a sense that sometimes people are not even aware of it? i've been saying, if you don't live it, you don't know it. sometimes i talk to people and they're not even aware. sometimes it's a culture. sometimes it's something you have been taught through media
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or the way a certain neighborhood works or a company works or an environment works, that you're not even aware of it. >> well, we have, as white folks, the privilege of what i call obliviousness, right, i don't have to know black and brown truth pause it's not going to be on the test. no matter what it is that i have to know to get into a school, to graduate from a school, civil service exam. i don't have to know what people of color experience. on the other hand, people of color better know what white america thinks is important or they'll never get through school at all. that is a privilege, but it also means we're left really with a huge blind spot around this subject. >> the other thing i think is hart hard is it's more complex. if we go back 50 years, it was pretty stark. pretty black and white. there were lines for blacks and whites. streetcars and schools for blacks and whites. people openly said the n-word. it is not acceptable now.
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most people think as long as i tonight say that black people are monkeys or that there are explicit segregation or i don't use the n-word -- >> there are certain things that are concrete. i always say, i'm not sure -- sometimes i don't have -- it's not -- you know, concrete, tangible. when the hairs on the back of your neck stand up, you know it when you see it or you know it when you feel it. >> the socioological evidence suggest middle class blacks in particular will give people the benefit of the doubt. generally, they will explain and the friend has to affirm that it was, in fact a racial incident. >> it has happened to me. or just ignorance. i want to talk to you about this. this story on social media was trending really highly in the beginning. since the president, what has happened? >> we, it's really gone down. interestingly enough, your black in america series has become the popular -- what we call internet, on twitter, as a popular trending topic. we're talking about this right
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now. talking about it on cnn. you're opening up a dialogue to allow us to talk about it, and b.i.a. is becoming part of that train. i think this is an open opportunity for the white house, for all of us, cnn involved, to really open up the dialogue and the conversation. >> yeah, you know, i can imagine being a journalist, you know, and being objective, but just by sitting here saying white people asking the questions, i'm going to get cite sided from people. it's kind of tough. i think we all need to have this conversation. the country needs to have this conversation. it is obvious from what happened in cambridge. we all were not there, but it's certainly caused a huge raucous. tim, your work is just so amazing. i respected you for a look time. i'm going to give you the last word. what is the teachable moment? >> i think the moment is very simple. the reality is that when people have different experiences with the institutions of the society, they're going to have different perceptions about reality. if we're going to bridge the
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perception gap, we're going to have to bridge the experience gap. until people of color are treated equitably in policing, housing, education, the job market, don't be surprised when folks of color think racism is prevale prevalent. if you want the perception issue, you have to get the experiences. >> you guys were amazing. thank you. i wish we could have devoted an entire hour to do. this is the pre-"black in america 2" we're doing here. i'll talk to you soon, i appreciate it. and "black in america 2" airs right after this on cnn. if you want to hear the entire discussion, go to our blog and click on don. i think my face is up there. let's talk more about this with our radio talk show host warren valentine and michael medsich. i know they were talking about this on radio. i was watching you guys, both of
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your faces as we were having -- letting that conversation play. is that uncomfortable to watch? is it uncomfortable for people to hear, michael? what do you think? >> i don't think so. i think it's useful. constructive. having people speak so reasonably about everybody else's experience is very, very constructive. i think that's the way we ought to be handling this gates/crowley kind of conversation. what troubles me about it is it's become such a huge deal. and when you think about it for a moment it really -- neither guy is accused of touching the other guy. the mistake that officer crowley made -- and it was a terrible mistake, tear berrible thing to he should not have arrested him. as a cop, no matter how excited professor gates might have gotten, crowley should have taken it. for gates, for him to have apparently reacted the way he did, what i think a lot of people are ignoring is that
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sergeant crowley came there because a neighbor reported a break-in. and what is a police officer supposed to do? he has to come in and look at it. >> our experts said last night that is where the sort of unknown racism comes from or -- was from the neighbor who possibly saw -- not that the neighbor's racist, but who saw two black men breaking into a home. might not have had the same reaction if it was two white men -- that was from some of our experts last night. warren, listening to you, and the other radio hosts, you, even though urban listeners may think it was racial profiling, you say you don't believe it was, firmly saying that. >> i don't believe it was racial profiling. what i think happened was simply this. i think the cop -- lawyers, we term it as contempt of cop. he charged him because he got mad. he got mad because this black professor this black man, was
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challenging his authority. and once he challenged his authority, he went there for the initial call, which every good cop would do. but once he challenged his authority, he got mad and the arrogance and the superiority factored in him. i think tim was right on the money when he said, look, the first thought with the airplane pilots was can they fly. i think this cop's first thought, once professor gates challenged his authority, was how dare you challenge my authority, and i'm gonna lock you up for doing it. i think that's what happened. >> here's the one thing, warren. i once was profiled. i've only been arrested twice. and my -- >> only twice. >> yes. and my second arrest, when i was 22 years old, i got arrested and profiled because i had long hair. it was the 1970s. if i had reacted in that situation like henry lewis gates did, i think you're right about the cop. he should not have reacted that
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way. i think if a white man challenged his authority -- >> he would not have arrested him. >> i'm not so sure. >> he wouldn't have arrested him -- >> wait, if a white professor had said -- talk to your mama on the porch, he said, you're a racist cop, your a rice aeft cop and had been shouting at him. look, as a cop, it's his job. he has to take it he has to walk away. he made a mistake. i think frankly i wish that sergeant crowley would apologize. but you know what -- >> exactly. >> -- it's also appropriate for professor gates to apoll skriz. >> a very respected scholar says, since when has talking you know what been a cause for arrest? a basis for arrest? in your own home? >> it was a trumped-up charge and that's why it was dropped so quickly. >> i think it's constructive to get it out, but i want to talk some of the deadlines the administration has to reach pretty soon. we're talking about health care. and then we've got guantanamo bay, which is a year, michael.
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and that part is something that's on your radar. >> well, think that what's striking here is president obama did something no other president has done before. he said, i'm going to get this done. i'm going to close guantanamo bay. now it looks like that deadline is no longer applicable. the same thing with health care. a vote at the end of august. now they've moved it. i think probably should pull back on the deadlines. >> i'm going to give warren the last word. he'll be out selling it next week. so it may be back to the drawing board for the president. >> i think it's going to be. lake i said, i don't think this is going to go through until may 2010. they need to be focusing on keeping those seats. to everybody who's been talking about is the president -- just remember this, hillary clinton fought tooth and nail for that white house position to be the president. if they had any doubt he wasn't a citizen, the clinton es would have exposed this. >> he is no doubt a citizen and president of the united states. >> i will leave it at that. i won't say any other word.
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except thank you both. it's a story that snowballed. we saw that. next, what sergeant crowley's partner has to say. and lance armstrong rolls into paris. but not as a leader as the pack. how does he feel about that? it might surprise you. 
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i spent time talking to people on both sides of the issue. i also spoke to the black officer who assisted sergeant crowley on that call to professor gates' home. his flame is sarname is sergean. people are going to pay closer
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attention because you're an african-american man and you're supporting this white officer that has been put out there by some that he was, you know, racially profiling dr. gates. they're going to pay attention to you. >> i hope they would. they called him -- i heard one of the comments, a rogue cop. there's nothing rogue about him. he was doing his job. >> you can see more of what sergeant crowley's colleagues had to say about him and the situation with gates at our blog cnn.com/newsroom. click on "don" and the story will be up. i want you to meet sophia danonburg who's climbing up from the past literally to reach the top of the world. an african-american first. so we've brought in a team of experts to help. one suggestion is to make your shipping more efficient with priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service. call or go online for a free supply and up to $160 in offers from authorized postage vendors. shipping's a hassle! weighing every box...
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the subject of our up from a past african-american person. she did not set out to be a first of anything. she simply got into her head one day to climb mt. everest. a short time later, she was on top of the world. she became the first african-american woman to scale the world's tallest peak. >> i think that my perspective on everest was different from a lot of people's. because it wasn't something that i had as a long-term goal. i hadn't dreamed about it since i was, you know, a little girl. i hadn't even dreamed about it at all. i didn't grow up in an outdoorsy family. i grew up in a family that liked warm weather. we didn't ski. we didn't hike. we didn't camp. we didn't fish. we didn't do anything in the outdoors. so in a sense this is -- kind of unusual.
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i think my father thinks i'm a crazy person. but at the same time, i was really raised to believe i could do anything. it was a very, very quick decision. it probably took me two weeks to decide that i was going to go. this was already the end of january, beginning of february. i needed to leave in the middle of march. i didn't have that much time to prepare. we started up and we started up with a bunch of people. and at some point, we to the balcony and it's just three of us. um, me and him and his brother. we looked down the mountain. we don't see any head lamps. it seems like we're there by ourselves. but what we could see, we looked below i us, it was just floor o clouds. we could actually see lightning going down below us. a bov above us, it was absolutely clear. the whole mountain. every single star. the peaks popping up through the
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clouds. we had climbed out of the storm. eight interesting factoid that i'm the first black woman to have summited. but i really wasn't setting out to do that. i was just -- it was a natural progression of my climbing. i think i was just climbing and that's what i do. there really aren't a lot of female climbers. i think one of the first things people ask me, did everyone sort of notice you? you're the only african-american there? i said, i'm not sure they really got beyond the fact i was female. there's probably like maybe a dozen female climbers at base camp. you have to imagine there's, you know, 500, 700 people at base camp, including the sherpas, and they're all men. so it's very noticeable if you're female. and i think the fact that i'm african-american is maybe a secondary thought in anyone's mind. when i look at my life, except -- and this is a big except, but except that i'm female and except that i'm african-american, i am a very typical mountaineer. i'm very sort of my age when i
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climbed everest incobeing in my early 30s. college educated. professional. middle class upbringing. everything about me is very typical as an everest climber. i think that what's more interesting is that i became very typical. my father came from a very underprivileged background. he, you know, he went through medical school and his undergraduate in six years after he got out of the army. he had two kids. he was raising his kids. he finished medical school. he became a doctor. he was able to overcome a lot in his life in order to be able to raise my sister and i in this typical middle class suburban family. there's other mountains i want to -- i would like to climb. i can give you a better climber to climb them. you know, pushing the boundaries a little bit on some unclimbed mountains. but it's, it's -- i don't know what -- i don't know why when it goes through my head, i don't know what -- why it doesn't sink
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in as, um, as, as -- you know, i'll have my moments where i'll go, wow, you know, you actually did that. you're actually the first. that's amazing. that you could be the first at anything. but at other moments it just -- i just think it's all sort of funny. and that i'm sort of an average climber that's being given these extraordinary opportunities to be doing these other things because, i, i -- i was sort of a black woman instead of being a more typical climber. and for that i'm just really sort of in awe and happy about that. >> sophia danenberg. one on one, an exclusive chat with lance armstrong conducted by our very own sanjay gupta.
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he's won the yellow jersey seven times. not this time, lance armstrong came in third. his teammate, alberto contodoro of spain came in second. the racer from luxembourg was third overall. cnn's chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta spoke immediately with armstrong immediately afterward. >> coming in first, is that something you thought about? do you care if you come in first or not? >> we well, i wanted to come in first. but sometimes in sports, there's somebody that's better. and i was that guy for seven
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years. i never understood what it felt like to get second or third. i'm 38 now. your race guys that are 24, 25, 26. they're fast. they're strong. they have acceleration. they have all of the things that you had at that age. you get third. that's what the great thing about the tour. the best man always wins. >> you can see are more of dr. gupta's exclusive interview with armstrong on "american morning." your feedback. it's crazy too. coming up. ps my airways open... to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a stayopentop g 'a er unoid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long.
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and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. to help me breathe better all day long. and it's not a steroid. announceit keeps my airways. advil pm or tylenol pm? with advil pm she's spending less time... lying awake with aches and pains... and more time asleep. he should switch to advil pm. the better night's sleep.
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i think i'll go with the basic package. good choice. only meineke lets you choose the brake service that's right for you. and save 50% on pads and shoes. meineke. let's read some of your comments. these are on twitter. one person says, i can't read that name. sometimes your names are so goofy here. talking to police officer the way it appears dr. gates did will get you arrested e
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